Packaging Technology

Marketing with Colors 

Let’s play a word association game. What words come to mind when I say:

Blue 

Green 

Red

Yellow

Colors elicit feelings, emotions, memories, associations. It’s no wonder then that businesses large and small use colors to add a dimension to their brand identity. What effect do colors really have though? 

Marketing with colors | packaging design | GTI Industries Inc

Well it’s safe to say we’re all different. Because of that, we process things differently and associate different things with colors, but when it comes to purchasing items and services, color plays a more pointed role. It’s not like we mentally say, “since yellow is my favorite color, I’m only going to buy things with yellow logos and packaging.” The process is a little more nuanced than that. 

Our brain looks at the color with a critical eye thinking, “Do these things match? Does bright pink packaging really match this knee brace product?” Sure, it’s eye catching, but a mismatch could swing consumers in the wrong direction. 

It’s also important for brand recognition. We all know one of the foremost tenants for marketing: differentiation. Companies don’t want to be mistaken for their competition. Think FedEx, UPS, and DHL. Totally different color schemes so no one mixes them up. They each stand alone with their own striking combination.

When picking a color for a brand or product/service, it’s much more than what’s a popular color. It matters what the object represents. Eco friendly consumers? Brown or green. Power and vitality? Black or red. 

It takes a lot of research and profiling to arrive on the best image for your brand, but the rewards are invaluable. Build your empire from the ground up and pay attention to every detail. When you’ve designed your logo, let GTI help you decide on the right printer and make your mark on your boxes. We’ve got to stick together after all. 

Metal Detectors Used in the Food Industry Keep us Safe

 
Metal Detectors Used in the Food Industry Keep us Safe
 

Food safety and quality experts, as well as food production experts, often use metal detection as a method for identifying foreign bodies and contaminants in food. Most of the time, these professionals consider three essential factors - capability or total application of the equipment, optimum detection point and total cost or benefit.

Food detection technologies continue to evolve and improve. Each time new processes and detection methods become available in the market, new standards and guidelines are set in place. The dynamic changes in food safety lead to confusion especially in the type and brand of metal detection equipment to use.

Just like radio waves, metal detection involves the use of electrical impulses. Detecting foreign bodies in food is determined by altered transmission and reception signals in electrical impulses. The difference in the expected signal and the received signal signifies the presence of foreign material in food. Metal detection used in the food industry is more complicated than those used in the security industry. In food safety and quality control, subject materials pass through the system faster. This can result in a lesser detection rate. Additionally, the type and size of the foreign material embedded in the product can have significant effects on the detection rate. False detections are common in metal detection and these can be highly frustrating and costly at the same time.

Metal detectors well suited in the food industry must possess certain qualities such as high sensitivity, full automation, ease of use, reliability, and robustness as well as cost effectiveness. Millions of subjects must pass through the system so it is important that a metal detection machine gives out a reliable outcome.