Business

Fenty Beauty Is Ushering in a New Era of Inclusivity In Beauty Packaging

The universally famous make up line named after the mastermind and beautiful face that brought it to the world is all everyone can talk about these days. Why? For one thing, the product fills a void felt by many makeup users of deeper, darker complexion. The make-up line boasts a collection of 40 tones from 100 to 470. The singer has been meticulously overseeing the development of the line, prioritizing its wearability, ensuring that makeup users are encouraged to be creative and unique in using the products. How does she get that message across? 

Established nyc Rihanna Fenty beauty Collection | Makeup Packging

Well, the make-up speaks for itself. Reviews are stellar and Fenty Beauty is on its way to being in the dictionary along with bootylicious, yowza, and NSFW, but before the makeup can speak for itself, the packaging beckoned shoppers to pick up the tubes and packs up off the shelves. Fast. 

Geometric shapes have really taken over. Just look at the trending geometric tattoos, makeup designs, display cases, etc. Following suit, some the Fenty Beauty line seems to mimic the honey comb. The latest line of cosmic gloss screams “pick me up!” with its rainbow psychedelic packaging giving a hint of the sparkle held inside the package. Still, other products build the suspense with an opaque container giving just enough of a teaser to entice but not enough to satisfy. You have to buy to satisfy. 

 

Also, Rihanna has made herself a walking billboard for her makeup. If there is a product that will make women look remotely as flawless as Rihanna, we’re pretty sure people will do whatever it takes to get it - even stalk the nearest Sephora until they restock their favorite item. 

Established nyc Rihanna Fenty beauty Sticks | GTIindustries.com

WE LOVE THE LOOK: Kylie Cosmetic's Valentine’s Day Collection

Valentine's Collection for Kylie Cosmetics
The Be Mine Valentines Collection by Kylie Jenner has already sold out

Kylie Jenner recently introduced via social media a preview of her upcoming Valentine's Collection for Kylie Cosmetics. The dynamic launch includes a fierce look, thanks to its vibrant packaging.  It features the iconic Kylie lip-drip logo but dazzles in red glitter. Kylie never seems to disappoint her fans.  The Be Mine Valentines Collection has already sold out, just like  past limited editions including the Birthday Collection, Holiday Collection and KoKo Kollection.

What makes us a huge fan of Kylie’s is how marketing and packaging combine to create perfection and stirs up a frenzy where consumers anxiously wait for their parcel to arrive on their doorstep.   Creating a look and establishing a brand blended with the right packaging is essential to a successful product launch.  In Kylie’s case, we think she does an amazing job with her line of cosmetics.  Keep up the flawless look.

Kylie's Cosmetic's Valentine's Day Collection features the iconic Kylie lip-drip logo but dazzles in red glitter ...

Kylie's Cosmetic's Valentine's Day Collection features the iconic Kylie lip-drip logo but dazzles in red glitter ...

The benefits of a foam-in-place system

Getting packaging decisions right is crucial for any company that has a need to ship products. If an order arrives broken at the buyer's door – whether the buyer is a consumer or another business – that relationship will also be damaged.

Depending on what a company regularly ships, packaging decisions can be relatively simple or complex. Shipping fairly durable items, such as books or clothing, minimizes the risk of damage. Boxes or even bags with minimal void fill should do the trick. In these instances, it's important to contain and protect, but there is little chance of breakage.

Other items are more sensitive to shock and motion during transport. Expensive electronic items, anything made of glass or ceramics and other delicate items require more forethought into the packaging decisions. If they have a unique shape, this could cause even more difficulty in deciding which protective packaging solution is best.

An all-inclusive solution
One popular type of packaging for these instances is foam-in-place. This is for good reason: Foam is incredibly shock-absorbent, and foam-in-place systems are highly versatile.


Foam-in-place systems involve two chemicals combining in real time to form a unique foam mold around the product itself. The mixture is collected in a polyethylene bag to protect the item itself, then rapidly expands, encapsulating the product in its own custom shell.

DoItYourself noted that the item is typically placed in the box or container in which it will be shipped first. Once the foam is applied, the package is ready to go. However, a company can also create a wooden mold for an item so the foam protection can be created without the item actually being present.

Storage ease
When making packaging decisions, there are more factors at play than effectiveness and consumer satisfaction, though these are two of the most important ones. Beyond them, however, businesses must think about ease of use, the ability to stock up on an item and cost-effectiveness.

In each of these aspects, foam-in-place systems have an advantage.

When the two chemicals come in contact, they rapidly expand as much as 200 times in size. This makes for thick and sturdy packaging around the item, but it also demonstrates how little room the pre-combined liquids take up. They can be stored away easily without getting in the way of other tasks that need to be accomplished or other materials and goods that need to be stored in the same location.

A foam-in-place system can keep motors safe during transport.
It's important to keep motors safe during transport. A foam-in-place system can absorb shock and vibrations during transport.


Learning curve
Using foam-in-place systems can also be very easy to learn for packers. According to Packaging World, Pregis' foam-in-place system, Maxwell, accomplishes this effectively. The system comes complete with an interface that allows the owner to provide instructional videos or photos to help packers understand how to operate the device. This is important considering the versatility of foam-in-place systems typically leads to many different items being packaged with it.

"In packaging operations which rely on FIP, workers are typically asked to package many different types of products," John Gee, IntelliPack Systems' national sales manager, explained. "Maxwell is capable of providing specific instructions regarding both material usage and bag placement for optimum protection. The operator can look at the screen to follow easy-to-understand photos or videos. These are also ideal for training and troubleshooting. Maxwell takes the guesswork out of the FIP packaging operation."

This also allows for a package to have great protection without excess packaging materials. In today's world where dimensional weight is a concern for businesses trying to keep shipping costs down, this is essential. Packers can also control how much foam is used for an item, giving them the ability to ensure the result isn't wasteful yet the package arrives perfectly intact.

Custom casing
Since the product forms the protective casing around the item quickly, production can be sped up. Packers won't need to strategize wrapping techniques or carefully-placed void fill materials because the foam creates a shell as unique as the shape and size of the item.

For those businesses shipping delicate or irregularly-shaped items, a foam-in-place system could be the best way to ensure packages are delivered with care.

PepsiCo betting on packaging to get an edge in the cola wars?

On a field visit to Navi Mumbai, PepsiCo's chief marketing officer Vipul Prakash gazes with satisfaction at his company's range of beverages, arranged at a vantage point above racks of traditional snacks and finger foods. "I can put up the best TV screen here and people won't see my ads as many times as they see this," he says.
By "this", Prakash is referring to packaging, a hitherto under-utilised weapon in Indian marketing. However, PepsiCo intends putting packaging front and centre. It's the big bet for 2016, which will hopefully trounce the competition in the annual cola wars that play out through gruelling summer months.

The rationale is quite simple. TV audiences are getting fragmented and ad avoidance is on the rise, even if it's not as much of a problem in India as it is elsewhere. Prakash says: "Even if a consumer watches our ad, it's for 30 seconds and a one way story." Bottles on the other hand are held for anywhere between 10 minutes and an hour.

And so PepsiCo is opting for an inversion of its strategy. Previously, packaging would change to reflect a large mass media campaign that broke on TV. "But if the consumer interacts with the pack so much, can we start the story there?" is what the cola giant is seeking an answer to.

While admitting that the full model is yet to be cracked, PepsiCo nevertheless claims to have notched some early successes. For instance 7Up Revive, a variant launched last year in Kerala and Tamil Nadu, set to go countrywide this year, hit the market in distinctive blue glass bottles with its PET variants featuring a full length wraparound plastic sleeve. The new pack helped highlight the features of Revive, going a long way to educating a sceptical consumer. Research later revealed that the No1 reason for trial was packaging.

For its flagship cola, PepsiCo is rolling out a desi variant of its global emoji campaign. A consumer can pick a bottle with an emoji that reflects his mood provided the range is between happy, party, naughty, etc. (Anger or existential despair are not included for obvious reasons.) An SMS code gives the consumer an opportunity for instant gratification with grand prizes like trips to Las Vegas and Ibiza, or net practice with Virat Kohli. There will be a TV commercial at some point, but Prakash believes with 38 emojis over 10 categories, the story is complete using just packaging. Even if the second stage of consumers sending in SMS does not take off to the extent Pepsi would like, he confesses to being very satisfied with stage one; "The visual appeal on shelves itself tells us the first part has worked."

Those expecting a My Can style TV blitz for Pepsi's 150 ml variant have a long wait ahead. As of now the mini can, priced at `15, is going to be pushed only by a series of web exclusive films, built around the theme 'never underestimate the little things in life'.

For Mountain Dew, the second leg of its real heroes campaign is embracing digital media in a big way. Instead of buying pre-rolls or banner ads, PepsiCo is relying on a combination of its bottles and Blippar, a service that links consumers to videos via codes on packaging. Part of the stories about the four real heroes begins on the label, provoking curiosity. A consumer wanting to know more can be taken to a branded video, to be watched when and where he chooses. While digital used to be considered an add on to TV in media dark areas, it's becoming the lead medium says Prakash; "TV reach is minimal but our bottles are everywhere." PepsiCo is working on weekly audio stories with content providers in Uttar Pradesh hoping to net potentially millions of otherwise hard to pin down consumers.

It's quite a shift at a time when most marketers still balk at riding on the consumer's precious bandwidth to deliver their messages. However Prakash believes "It's not about the brand but the story. If they've watched four minutes and enjoyed it, two seconds of branding will do more than 30 seconds of in your face messaging. I keep telling my teams, 'If a consumer has X amount of bandwidth, would he watch a song or your content?' Your content has to be interesting enough to be chosen." Even the Mountain Dew films deal more with the philosophy of risk than with traditional endorsement. "We don't show our real heroes drinking Mountain Dew" says Prakash.

Going for full length wraps on bottles is something PepsiCo has worked on in the past. It invariably got derailed because it was considered too expensive, with marketing and production bickering over who was to pay for it. But things are different now with even the CFO insisting Revive not be launched unless it has a full sleeve. The brand manager on 7Up Nimbooz Masala Soda agreed to pull back on television to accommodate full wraparounds. Says Prakash, "When you get the support from the top it's easier. I thought we'd not be able to do it for three years. But when there's a sales and consumer pull it comes together." The sales force in particular has been galvanised by the new packaging and are pushing for more in store real estate. Even the visicoolers have been revamped to display packs to best advantage.

According to Shripad Nadkarni, founder MarketGate, who has previous experience at Coca-Cola, "Using packaging to drive home the message is a well established practise especially for teen and lifestyle brands.

The use of emojis as a language that's current is a good strategy." However he cautions that, packaging and TV serve very different purposes and one should not be at the expense of the other. When it comes to wraprounds, he believes these are best tactically deployed else they run the risk of becoming first the new norm and then the new clutter. However the biggest challenge which has as yet been inadequately addressed by either player, according to Nadkarni, is finding out how they can play a more powerful role in the lives of teens.

As for whether it's all going to work, Prakash admits that's still something that remains to be seen. Whether packaging is in fact the answer will be revealed if the packs survive the transition from scorching summers to the squelchy humid monsoons.

McDonald's Serves Up New 'Modern' Packaging

"New year, new me."

McDonald's appears to be adopting the adage and announced today that it has given its packaging a modern makeover -- forgoing the familiar red, white and gold motif and replacing it with bold colors.

This month, the biggest fast food chain in the world is rolling out new carry-out bags, fountain beverage cups and sandwich boxes at its restaurants in the U.S., McDonald's said in a news release today.

The latest look -- featuring colorful accents and bold typography -- will also expand to over 36,000 restaurants worldwide throughout the rest of 2016, the company said.

"McDonald’s is a fun and modern brand and this was a progressive way to turn our packaging into art and support a community where fashion is an expression," said Matt Biespiel, senior director of Global Marketing, according to the news release.

PHOTO: McDonalds global packaging is pictured through the Years 1955-2016.McDonalds
McDonald's global packaging is pictured through the Years 1955-2016.
"Every day 69 million customers visit McDonald’s around the world and this new packaging will be a noticeable change," Biespiel said. "It was fun to join these ideas together and create playful pieces that connect our customers to the Brand."

McDonald's added that the new look is not only stylish but sustainable.

To celebrate the unveiling of the new packaging, two students from Miami International University of Art and Design created an original "couture collection" of "one-of-a-king accessories" under 48 hours using 50 bags, 72 straws, 22 cups and eight sandwich boxes with the new packaging.